Liberia To Send Additional Soldiers To Mali

NEWS REPORTER
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The Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces of Liberia, Major General Prince Charles Johnson III has disclosed that the United Nations has asked Liberia to increase its military strength in Mali by 45 percent.

General Johnson declined to clearly state the number of AFL Soldiers the 45% represents on grounds that doing so might compromise the security of the current troop in Timbuktu, Mali.

“The soldiers are doing well. Currently as I speak to you, the United Nations has asked us to increase by 45% of what we have there. The 45% will be a company plus size,” Maj. General Johnson said.

The AFL’s boss said “I can’t tell now the number of soldiers the 45% represents. The issue of stating exact number could compromise the security of the soldiers we currently have on Mission in Timbuktu, Mali.”

Gen. Prince C. Johnson

According to General Jonson, the AFL soldiers will be leaving for Sector West in Timbuktu, Mali mid-August to help enforce the UN Peacekeeping Mission in that African country.

“I will tell you that the information coming from Mali is very rewarding for the Armed Forces of Liberia that’s why the UN has requested us (Liberia) to increase the size we currently have there,” General Johnson noted.

“In Southern Sudan the newest country in Africa, we also have Military Staff Officer (MSO) there. We also have Military Staff Officer (MSO) in Sudan so our presence is in three countries where we are making sure with the help of others to restore peace,” The AFL Chief of Staff said.

He further added “We are doing extremely well I will tell you. I am happy with the work the guys are doing in Mali, Sudan and South Sudan.”

“I will tell you it means a lot. You may be aware that our last peacekeeping mission was in the 1960s in the Congo and after so many years, in 2013 former President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf decided to launch the AFL into peacekeeping. I think we will say all credits go to the people of Liberia first, the government under Madame Sirleaf and the current government under President George Manneh Weah for always providing all necessary support for us to be in those countries,” General Johnson mentioned.

“The national army then was disbanded and restructured because of activities that went on during our civil war. If you read the Truth and Reconciliation Commission report (TRC) our institution was rated number seven for worst atrocities committed during the civil war among 27 warring fractions and just imagine from 2006 to 2013 to launch the army into peace keeping, I am proud,” he said.

General Johnson noted that the progress made by the soldiers in Mali, Sudan and South Sudan, shows how much Liberia is committed in keeping peace across the African Continent.

He boasted that the army is ever ready to tackle the issue of terrorism that is sweeping across Africa.

“Terrorism has crossed the Sahara and is creeping fast south of the Sahara in West Africa. Today Mali, Burkina Faso and other countries we keep hearing news of terrorist activities in those countries. It is time we move to put a halt to that issue. We have to swiftly move to work with the ECOWAS and the UN to put a halt to the spread of terrorism,” General Prince C. Johnson III said. 

“With Liberia been in it, I will tell you say the experience is there just in case we have any issue of such, the army is trained to be able to counter any activity of terrorism. We are ready for that,” he mentioned.

General Johnson then praised the United Nations for always prioritizing the empowerment of Liberian soldiers and noted it was a good thing to partner with the UN in Mali.

“We are getting a lot of benefits from the United Nations. For now, the soldiers in Mali are receiving 80% allowances from the UN; while the 20% goes for operational cost,” General Johnson said.

Meanwhile, the Chief of Staff of the Armed Forces of Liberia is calling on the government of Liberia to capture peacekeeping support in the national budget. “For now, it is not there all the time the soldiers been out. It is the 20% we been using for operational cost including getting passports, contingency cost all come from the same 20%,” General Johnson noted. Contributed by Trokon Wrepue/trokon19

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About Post Author

NEWS REPORTER

Alphonso Toweh Alphonso has  been in the profession for over twenty years. He has worked for many international media outlets including: West Africa Magazine, Africa Week Magazine, African Observer and did occasional reporting for CNN, BBC World Service, Sunday Times, NPR, Radio Deutchewells, Radio Netherlands. He is the current correspondent for Reuters. Mr. Toweh holds first MA with honors in International Relations and a candidate for second master in International Peace studies and Conflict Resolution.
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