Weah Defends His Spending

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-Says He Gets Gifts As President

At long last, President Manneh Weah has publicly defended what some Liberians described as his spending  as President of the oldest African Republic.

Since becoming President of the country, the Liberian Chief Executive has been microscoped on several occasions over his attire by some Liberians believed to be his critics.

Although he remains one of the richest footballers on the African continent prior to becoming a politician, but his critics continue to allege that he wasted all his resources and reportedly using the Liberian presidency as a recovery ground.

The world footballer of the year, European best, African best has been accused on several occasions of being ‘wasteful’ on his attire, despite the country crippling economy.

In his first year as President, the Liberian leader embarked on renovating and expanding his homes on 9th street, the refurbishing of the Jamaica Resort on the Roberts International Airport highway, the construction of his private church along with housing estate on the same high among others. Some Liberians and political pundits see as ‘misuse of state’s resources.’ Besides, his attire continue to draw public’s attention.

However, speaking over the weekend when he was honored by some citizens of Lofa County, the ‘political stronghold’ of the political leader of the opposition Unity Party (UP), Joseph Boakai, the Liberian leader bragged that he is fully capacitated to purchase any wearing on his own and not from the state’s coffers  

According to him, as a former world best footballer and also an employee of government, he is capacitated to obtain the different types of wearing at his wish.

He further said most of the foot wears he has worn on national occasions are sometimes given to him as gifts.

But political pundits alleged that some of the wearing the President considers as gifts are above US$2000.00, saying it is in violation of the National Code of Conduct 2014.

Section 1.3 Interpretation; 1.3.3 Casual Gifts of the National Code of Conduct states “any unsolicited present or gift, of a modest scale given to a Public Official or Employee of Government which is not connected to their official duties, which does not exceed US$200.00 in value. This provision shall not apply to gifts given during cultural and customary celebrations.”

The Liberian leader also told OkayFM that there are prominent Liberians who wear more expensive clothing, including foot wears just like him. 

Upon taking office, President Weah declared his assets, but weren’t made public. When contacted by the BBC why he didn’t make his assets public, President Weah said he has his children and other family members to protect.

Some political pundits considered his statement as embracing corruption and not living by example as announced in his inaugural address that he was prepared to fight corruption in the country.

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