Sit-In Protest Looms

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-Over Land Rights

Chiefs across Liberia are petitioning lawmakers while activists are reportedly preparing for a sit-in protest in the nation’s capital as they push to secure ancestral land rights, regarded as key to averting renewed bloodshed in the resource-rich country.

farmland in Liberia

Recently, about 100 women marched on the National Legislature to kick off a campaign to amend the Land Rights Act (LRA), a watered-down version of which was passed by the House of Representatives in August, after years of delay.

One of the Activist, Ali Kaba of Sustainable Development Institute (SDI) told Reuters that they are trying to reach out directly to President George Weah.

“We are aiming to present our petitions together as activists, traditional leaders and women groups to the Senate which is due to review the law,” he said.

Most of Liberia’s 4 million people live on land held under customary tenure, which is largely administered by chiefs but is not secured or recognized by legal title, according to the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

Land has been at the center of many armed conflicts in Liberia and is seen as a potential catalyst for unrest and threat to the nation’s peace, said Liberia’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, set up after a 2003 peace deal.

Two decades of civil war – in which some 250,000-people died following an uprising by Charles Taylor in 1989 – complicated land tenure as most records were destroyed, said James Yarsiah, head of Rights and Rice Foundation, a Liberian advocacy group.

President George Weah, a former football star who was inaugurated in January, has ordered a review of land concessions entered into by previous administrations to ensure they are legal and that performance requirements have been met.

Under his predecessor, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Liberia accelerated policies granting concessions to logging, palm oil and natural rubber companies, which helped to attract some $15 billion in foreign investment, the Finance Ministry said.

“The community only wants a fair share of their land and fair share on its investments. We saw the president’s directive as an opportunity to push for LRA,” said Yarsiah.

Concessions for logging, mining and agriculture cover more than 40 percent of the country, according to the Civil Society Organizations Working Group on Land Rights in Liberia.

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About Post Author

Reporter

Reuben Sei Waylaun Managing Editor A trained Liberian journalist and Administrator with over eight active years in mainstream media. He has worked with both the electronic and print media as radio producer, newscaster, reporter, News Editor, Editor-In-Chief, and Managing Editor respectively. He has a very good understanding of the Liberian media and very good working relations with media houses across the country and good at lobbying with his peers and above at all times. Reuben is a graduate of the University of Liberia with BPA in PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION & MANAGEMENT with emphasis in Development Planning Administration & Public Policy. In Management, he has emphasis in Human Resource management, Small Business Management and Business law respectively
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